• CHOPIN-PLANET
    Chopin Project Educational Outreach
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    Fryderyk Chopin's initials embellish the gate at The Hermitage -- formerly the Museum of the Chopin Festival -- where, in the summer of 1826, the Chopin family came to the spa at Duszniki "to take the waters."
    Poppies over Burma
    16 Nohant Typical Berry Country Road - Nocturne in C Minor, 1847 [KK 1233-5] AG
  • Photo from "Chopin's Europe" courtesy Hanna Komarnicki
    Nohant Manor -- Garden Entry from "Chopin's Europe" courtesy MUZA, SA and Hanna Komarnicki
    03 Springtime at Nohant Manor Small
    Chopin's Warsaw No. 2
    OP 9 No 2 Cover
    Hexameron Image
  • 503_HistAsolo--0606WEB
    Tribute to Chopin
    Chopin Nocturnes Op. 48 Title page
    Nohant Window 2 [96]
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    william-kapell-recital

Today the Chopin Project spotlight falls on Russian-born Michigan pianist Olga Kleiankina, performing the First Impromptu (in A-flat, Op. 29, No. 1) by Chopin. By its very title “Impromptu” is supposed to mean just that — just a perky, playful little ditty that Fryderyk would dash off at the keyboard without a lot of forethought or consideration. The reality is, of course, anything but that! Chopin’s Impromptus are eternally popular, and devilishly difficult to pull off. Olga Kleiankina adds, “I felt a lot of pressure preparing for these concerts and was more than a little anxious. But the audiences were very warm, and it turned out to be such a pleasure. Even though I didn’t happen to play any major works, (many of them were almost unknown, in fact!), I came to love all my pieces, and I felt the audience did too. Even though they were miniatures, I felt that each one was perfectly organized from the very inside – in a way, a microcosmos….part of the transcendental world of Chopin’s imagination.”

Hear pianist Olga Kleiankina play this Impromptu in A-flat, Op. 29, No. 1 before an appreciative Ann Arbor audience.

And read more about the Impromptus on Chopinmusic.net